Six for Sunday: Bookish Loves

#SixforSunday is hosted by Steph at A Little But A Lot. Each week she gives a book-themed prompt for a list of six and this week that prompt is

Bookish Loves

I’m sure this should be books I love, things I love to see in books etc and it should almost definitely be older books, but 🤷‍♀️

Today I’ve chosen 6 of my favourite picture books on the theme of love.

First off three funny ones – these are always my top choices for a Valentines Day display/table at work (in the case of the first two, I’m not sure what that says about me…)

Both I Love You Stick Insect and Tadpole’s Promise have brilliant twists/’punchlines’ at the end. I love them both and they crack me up.

This one’s a little more tender but still very funny and relatable!

Next up a true story. I’m. Not one for squishiness, but this really is an ‘aaaw’ kind of book!

Mr and Mrs Large are probably one of my favourite fictional couples and the Large family stories represent the love of a family with enough humour to feel much more believable than some of the soppier offerings!

And finally an antithesis to all those romantic happily ever afters. Long live Princess Smartypants!

I promise some more MG/YA in my #SixforSunday choices soon!

What would your bookish loves be? What do you think of my choices? Have you taken part in #SixforSunday? Leave a link to your post in the comments!

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Peapod’s Picks: Lemur Love!

Peapod’s Picks is a weekly round up of some of the books that Peapod* has read (usually for his bedtime story) each week plus a review of at least one of them.

*His social media alter ego, not his real name!

This week:

Frann Preston-Gannon’s ‘How To Lose a Lemur’.

I’d bought this pre-Peapod. I love lemurs and picture books, so spotting the two together was a massive win!

Even more so when it’s written and illustrated by such a talent (if you haven’t read any of her others, do so – I’ve mentioned before how funny I find Dave’s Cave and Dave’s Rock and The Journey Home is wonderful).

I love how different all her books are, though running throughout them all there’s a strong theme of friendship, plenty of humour and of course brilliant illustrations.

In the case of How To Lose A Lemur, a lot of the humour is to be found in the illustrations – one of my favourite spreads is the boy escaping in a boat unaware of the lemurs snorkeling below.

As the lemurs follow the boy further and further, we travel on trains, bikes, boats and balloons through mountains, deserts, snow and sea – this book has it all!

It’s a brilliant read, with plenty of understated humour and a lovely (but not in anyway saccharine) message of friendship and giving others a chance.

Plus, Peapod loved the lemurs almost as much as me!

Other lemur books we love:

  • Flying Lemurs by Zehra Hicks
  • Lemur Dreamer by Courtney Dicmass

What else did we read this week?

  • Here We Are by Oliver Jeffers (such a gorgeous book!)
  • How to Catch a Star by Oliver Jeffers
  • Extra Yarn by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen (who knew there was a Barnett & Klassen I’d not yet read?!)
  • Angry Cookie by Laura Dockrill (review on Monday!)
  • Ten Little Robots by Mike Brownlow and Simon Rickerty (all 3 of us LOVE this series!)

Have you read any of these?

Do you know of any other lemur-themed picture books we’re missing?!

Which picture books or bedtime stories did you read this week?

Peapod’s Picks 11/1/19

Peapod’s Picks is a weekly round up of some of the books that Peapod* has read (usually for his bedtime story) each week plus a more in depth review of at least one of them – this week a classic- Jill Murphy’s On The Way Home.

*His social media alter ego, not his real name!

What did we read this week?

  • Oi, Duck-Billed Platypus by Kes Gray and Jim Field
  • You’re Called What?! by Kes Gray and Nikki Dyson (inspired by the un-rhymable creatures in Oi Platypus!)
  • Snow Bears by Martin Waddell (After watching Gordon Buchansn with the grizzly bears in Russia!)
  • Ten Little Dinosaurs by Mike Brownlow and Simon Rickerty (Daddy loves this series!)
  • The Wolf, The Duck and The Mouse by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen (I love anything this pair do!)

and

On the Way Home by Jill Murphy

This was one of my favourite stories when I was little, thanks in no small part to the fact that it was one of my mum’s favourites too! (We are huge Jill Murphy fans – The Worst Witch, The Large Family, Peace at Last…)

So it was lovely to read it to Peapod and look ahead to all the times we’ll read it as he gets older – it’s one of those great books that crosses a wide age range.

Peapod loved the illustrations, and I really like the comic strip style layout and design, as well as the repetition which older children will enjoy (my favourite bit to read is the “Well…!” on each page – it’s the small things!)

It’s a scenario that will resonate with parents and older children – Claire’s hurt her knee and is on her way home for a plaster. But did she get her bad knee falling from a witch’s broom or being dropped by a giant? Has she hurt it bring knocked down by an alligator or a gorilla? Her amusing and imaginative tales are great for some really expressive and dramatic reading, and offer the perfect opportunity for older children to come up with their own ideas too!

First published in 1982 and first read to me just a few years after, this remains a favourite over 30 years later and I’m looking forward to plenty of re-reads with Peapod!

Are you a Jill Murphy fan like us?

Which stories have you read at bedtime this week?

Peapod’s Picks 4/1/19

Peapod’s Picks is a weekly round up of some of the books that Peapod* has read (usually for his bedtime story) each week plus a more in depth review of at least one of them – this week Claude All At Sea by Alex T. Smith.

*His social media alter ego, not his real name!

What did we read this week?

The start of the week saw the end of December, and the last of our Christmas books (you can see all the books we read here).

On Tuesday, we read Claude. Then, on Wednesday, Daddy chose ‘Laura’s Star’ by Klaus Baumgart and yesterday we read The Fox and the Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith(after ‘From Baby to Bronte’ read The Worm and the Bird earlier in the week and reminded me of her books!)

Claude All At Sea by Alex T. Smith

This was one of Peapod’s Christmas presents. And it was a total surprise (after all, who buys the bookseller books?!) which made it even better! I (I mean *he*) was thrilled! Even more so when I found out it was signed!

So, what better way to kick off the new year and a return to non-Christmas books than with this one?!

Firstly, Claude as a character is totally brilliant – expressive, funny and just quite happily doing his thing. With a beret full of useful stuff and trusty sidekick Sir Bobblysock, Claude can cope with anything that comes his way!

Which is just as well, because being swept out to sea in your bath then eaten by a sea monster called Kevin (oh, the warning signs 😂) is quite something!

The illustration is full of life too – no mean feat when only using a restricted palette in this way. But there’s texture, movement and a big, bold character to it all which rather captured ‘Peapod’s attention!

It’s an imaginative, pacy and above all FUN read that somehow manages to be creative, funny and matter of fact. We very much enjoyed it and I’m looking forward to reading the other Claude books with ‘Peapod’ when he’s bigger!

Have you or your little ones read any of these?

Which stories have you read at bedtime this week?

Snow in the Garden – A First Book of Christmas

 

I was thrilled to receive a review copy of this in exchange for a review – Shirley Hughes is such a special author that has played a large part in so many childhoods; from Dogger (my sister’s favourite) to the Alfie stories (my own) via Lucy and Tom and her poetry – she has a style, both in her illustration and text, that is reassuringly warm and charming, so she is a surefire hit for a bookish Christmas treat!

In this book, her stories, poems and artwork are accompanied by plenty of traditional, but timeless Christmassy things to do: paper lanterns, shortbread and paper robins, for example and it’s a perfect match.

I was transported back to my own childhood by the activities: I could see the flour dusted kitchen counter, smell Christmas biscuits baking and feel the excitement of a rainy afternoon spent indoors with scissors, glue and glitter!

Likewise, the poems are incredibly evocative – seeing your breath on a cold, winter morning, bare branches and wrapping up warm for walks in the park; being cosy and warm when it’s dark and cold outside, and – of course – the magical build up to and wait for Christmas.

The stories also bring back plenty of memories – school nativities, snowy days and family life. And that is what Shirley Hughes is so good at, in both the text and the expressive and detailed illustrations – describing everyday, family life with warmth, honesty and humour.

This is a beautiful book, and will make a wonderful addition to a Christmas collection. The combination of activities and stories/poems/illustrations make it ideal for dipping into throughout the season and, while there’s a wonderful sense of nostalgia and old fashioned charm, there’s also plenty for new, young readers to love and relate to – playing in the snow, going for wintry walks and acting in the school nativity – and the activities are timeless: Christmas wouldn’t be Christmas without paper decorations, homemade cards and gingerbread!

A cosy, nostalgic hug of a book and an absolute delight – it’s one we’ll be getting out year after year.

Peapod’s Picks: Alfie

I’m conscious I’ve not posted a Peapod’s Picks for a few weeks now either! Best laid plans… Speaking of which, the next few weeks of Peapod’s Picks will be the books from our book advent (as long as I can get my act together and post!) For this week though, it’s an old favourite…

This week: Alfie

I loved the Alfie series when I was little and, after receiving Snow in the Garden by Shirley Hughes (review to follow during our book Advent in December!) last week, I chose An Evening at Alfie’s as our bedtime story.

I’d been reminded of the wonderful way she depicts the little hiccups and triumphs, the daily events that make up family life and the little details of our everyday surroundings and happenings.

So we read An Evening at Alfie’s, where Alfie hears a drip drip drip and discovers a leak from a pipe while Maureen’s babysitting. When we finished, Peapod’s Dad said “Hmm. Well, that was an unusual one wasn’t it?” When I asked what he meant, he replied “Well, nothing happened.” which totally threw me.

To me, these stories are nostalgia and warmth; gentle tales full of the familiar. There’s no dragons or monsters or robots here. Nothing here of the ridiculous, crazy or wild. Here are children playing, shopping, having baths, going to parties, getting new shoes, losing toys – the events that are seemingly, well, uneventful but that are a child’s world.

But to his Dad, who’d clearly never read them as a child, they were books about the mundane, lacking excitement or adventure. He didn’t dislike it as such, just found it a little dull. I’m hoping to convert him…!

Have you read the Alfie books (or indeed any of Shirley Hughes’ others)? What do you think of them?

Dragon Post

I’ve mentioned before how much I loved stories about dragons as a child, (ok, both my mum and I still do). I also LOVE post – real, through the letterbox, not a bill type post – my friend and I even started sending each other letters because it’s so nice to receive one!

So when I received this book from. Walker (thank you 😊) I was beyond excited…

With ‘real’ letters to open and read; a warm and funny storyline; characterful, expressive illustrations; and, of course, an incredibly loveable dragon (who just can’t help the trouble he’s causing!) this is such a wonderful book.

The main story and illustrations are simply told and engaging with a visual humour that will appeal to everyone, from the very young up.

Meanwhile the letters are longer, more detailed and contain more sophisticated sentences, word play and humour – ideal for older readers who still love picture books (who doesn’t?!)

There is so much to love about this book and its perfect for poring over together at home, but I suspect will be equally popular in the classroom – there is SO MUCH you can do with this book. From instructions for looking after unusual pets to all kinds of letter writing to editing for mistakes, not to mention the animal welfare/habitat tangent you could take, or the wealth of exciting dragon activities that would tie in with it.

One of my favourite picture books of recent months – I loved it!